Categories

RSS Aggregator

LoCloud is a Best Practice Network of 32 partners, co-funded under the CIP ICT-PSP Programme of the [...]

This past Monday, in my musing, I mentioned Kanu Hawaii–a nonprofit that recruits people to take act [...]

The iPad market is saturated. Tablets are gadgets for a largish, elite niche. So, as a technology, t [...]

The Art & Science of Curation is a project which explores ideas around Curation and the role of [...]

New Byzantine texts were added to the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae on 22 April 2014 0082 APOLLONIUS DYS [...]

(10) metadata entry Contribution: Susanne Uhlirz Name: Susanne Uhlirz URL: link to the original post [...]

Archäologie und Computer 2007. Workshop 12 Wien 2008. PDF-Files auf CD-ROM Preis: zehn Euro ISBN 978 [...]

The following is an excerpt from a Program Update by Christa Williford, with contributions from Amy [...]

Todays list of Open Access (free to read) Archaeology articles:STAC: The Severe Terrain Archaeologic [...]

Personal Digital Archiving 2014. Photo by Bill Lefurgy. Cinda May, a key organizer of the Personal D [...]

Google has released all its old Google Street View pictures, so we can travel back in time…. We’ve g [...]

New Voices In Classical Reception Studies Conference Proceedings Volume 1 Conference Proceedings Vol [...]

At the Inaugural Texas Digital Humanities Consortium Conference (TXDHC) on April 12, Elijah Meeks su [...]

Irmengard MAYER1 / Marina DÖRING-WILLIAMS1/ Georgios TOUBEKIS2 / Michael JANSEN2 / Michael PETZET3 ( [...]

Filippo SUSCA (Dipartimento di Progettazione dell’Architettura, Facoltà di Architettura di Firenze, [...]

Top Subscribed RSS

Top Contributors

Digital dig: The scanning technology revolutionising archaeology


Archaeologists may not need to get their hands so dirty any more, thanks to the kind of digital technology being pioneered at Southampton University.
Its ‘µ-VIS Centre for Computed Tomography’ possesses the largest, high energy scanner of its kind in Europe: a ‘micro-CT’ machine manufactured by Nikon.
Capable of resolutions better than 0.1mm – the diameter of a human hair – it allows archaeologists to carefully examine material while still encased in soil.
Using visualisation software, archaeologists can then analyse their finds in 3D. This keeps the material in its original form, and postpones any commitment to the painstaking process of excavation by hand.
Graeme Earl and Mark Mavrogordato of Southampton University, and Alexandra Baldwin of the Department of Conservation and Scientific Research at the British Museum, explained how they have worked together to unlock the secrets of a cauldron found at a site in Chiseldon, Swindon – the largest archaeological find of its type in Europe.

Watch the video…
[...]

Share

The Portable Antiquities Scheme joins Pelagios

A screenshot of the finds.org.uk database front end

Hacking Pelagios rdf in the ISAW library, June 2012Earlier in 2012, the excellent Linked Ancient World Data Institute was held in New York at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW). During this symposium, Leif and Elton convinced many … [...]

Share