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By Jason Rhody Several projects funded by NEH’s Office of Digital Humanities have been featured in t [...]

Users are now able to create audio and video playlists with WordPress 3.9. They work as a shortcode, [...]

The Art & Science of Curation is a project which explores ideas around Curation and the role of [...]

Botanics Magazine (Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh) Journal of the Marine Biological Association of [...]

One of the themes covered in CFM’s TrendsWatch 2014 report is the power of big data and data analyti [...]

Online Resources for Archaeological Research Workshop: This workshop will introduce archaeological r [...]

An Analytical Onomasticon to the Metamorphoses of OvidWILLARD MCCARTY, with MONICA MATTHEWS, AARA SU [...]

PhD Studentship in Digital Humanities / Information ManagementSalary Range: Stipend and fees Post ty [...]

Guest post by Maria Drabczyk, National Audiovisual Institute, Poland A pilot competition for the bes [...]

ieldran, the Early Anglo-Saxon Cemetery Mapping Project, is officially live and can be found here: i [...]

On 12 February 2014, the UKB has promised her support to the SCOAP3 project. UKB is the Dutch consor [...]

Dear Melbourne DH folk, Following the DHA 2014 conference in Perth, a group of us are keen to start [...]

Taylor & Francis Green OA Self-Archiving Policy is just fine for OA needs: 3.2 Retained rights I [...]

The following is a guest post from Jane Mandelbaum, co-chair of the National Digital Stewardship All [...]

Heidelberger historische Bestände: Archäologische Literatur – digital Zu den Beständen des Sondersam [...]

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Digital dig: The scanning technology revolutionising archaeology


Archaeologists may not need to get their hands so dirty any more, thanks to the kind of digital technology being pioneered at Southampton University.
Its ‘µ-VIS Centre for Computed Tomography’ possesses the largest, high energy scanner of its kind in Europe: a ‘micro-CT’ machine manufactured by Nikon.
Capable of resolutions better than 0.1mm – the diameter of a human hair – it allows archaeologists to carefully examine material while still encased in soil.
Using visualisation software, archaeologists can then analyse their finds in 3D. This keeps the material in its original form, and postpones any commitment to the painstaking process of excavation by hand.
Graeme Earl and Mark Mavrogordato of Southampton University, and Alexandra Baldwin of the Department of Conservation and Scientific Research at the British Museum, explained how they have worked together to unlock the secrets of a cauldron found at a site in Chiseldon, Swindon – the largest archaeological find of its type in Europe.

Watch the video…
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The Portable Antiquities Scheme joins Pelagios

A screenshot of the finds.org.uk database front end

Hacking Pelagios rdf in the ISAW library, June 2012Earlier in 2012, the excellent Linked Ancient World Data Institute was held in New York at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW). During this symposium, Leif and Elton convinced many … [...]

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